University of Oregon

Marine Life Center

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This page shows CMLC programs and events. 

For general information, or to become a volunteer or member, please visit CharlestonMarineLifeCenter.com


Public Programs

December 10th – Once Upon A Time… and, Perhaps Again: Sea Otters In Oregon

Robert Bailey, Board President, Elakha Alliance

NOTE: This program takes place in the OIMB Boathouse Auditorium

Once common on the Oregon coast, sea otters were hunted nearly to extinction for their rich fur in the late 1700s and early 1800s.  Although they have returned elsewhere, they remain missing on the Oregon coast. What will it take to help them return to Oregon?

This talk will explore the history of sea otters in Oregon, their ecological and cultural importance, and the prospects for their return and recovery. It will touch on the mission of the Elakha Alliance, an Oregon non-profit organization devoted to sea otter conservation.

  • • Tuesday, December 10th
  • • 7:00 pm
  • • Free Admission

OIMB’s Boathouse Auditorium is at the end of Boat Basin Rd, past the Coast Guard Housing.  Please park along Boat Basin Road before entering Coast Guard Housing, and walk to the end of the road.  Very limited parking is available at the auditorium itself.

 

 

January 5th – Pub Science at 7 Devils – Not Your Average Barnacles: The Ruthless, Ravenous Rhizocephalans

Reyn Yoshioka, PhD Candidate at OIMB

NOTE: This program takes place at 7 Devils Brewery, a family-friendly restaurant in Coos Bay.

You’ve probably seen hundreds of barnacles along the Oregon Coast. Perhaps you’ve even eaten the weird, awkward gooseneck barnacles. But have you seen rhizocephalans? These barnacles, with strange and nearly unrecognizable forms, have even stranger effects on the crustaceans they infect! Come hear about some of the most incredible parasites the ocean has to offer.

  • • Sunday, January 5th
  • • 3:00 pm
  • • Takes place at 7 Devils: 247 S 2nd Street in Coos Bay.

 

 


School and Camp Programs – Advance Registration Required

Teachers/Camps – Bring your Students/Campers to the CMLC!

To arrange school/camp visits, please fill out our Registration Form.


Guided Class or Camp Tours

img_0234Bring your students for a guided tour of the CMLC Tuesdays 8:30am-5pm and Wednesdays-Fridays 8:30-11:00 am. Tours lasts 1 hour.

      • • Designed for a maximum of 30 students
      • • $1.50 per student, minimum fee of $25
      • • Teacher and first 5 chaperones are free, additional chaperones are $5 adult/$4 senior (62 and above)
      • • Must have 1 chaperone for every 6 students (preK-6th grade) or every 10 students (7th – 12th grade)
      • • Contact us regarding special needs

Class or Camp Programs

CMLC class or camp programs are offered Tuesdays 8:30am-5pm and Wednesdays-Fridays 8:30-11:00 am. We offer guided educational programs geared to NGSS standards. NOTE: We are constantly developing and testing programs, so check back throughout the year for more options.

      • • Designed for a maximum of 30 students
      • • $3.00 per student, minimum fee of $45
      • • Teacher and first 5 chaperones are free, additional chaperones are $5 adult/$4 senior (62 and above)
      • • Must have 1 chaperone for every 6 students (preK-6th grade) or every 10 students (7th – 12th grade)
      • • Contact us regarding special needs

Living in Tidepools-Adaptations   (K-2nd grades)

Tidepools are challenging places to live. As tides come and go, these areas along rocky shores are sometimes exposed to waves, hot sun, rain, and different predators. In this lesson geared to younger grades, students learn about common local tidepool animals, challenges they face, and adaptations they have to survive at low tide. The program combines problem-solving, observation of animals, and exploration of the center’s aquaria.

Concepts covered:
Animal Diversity
Adaptation
Intertidal

      • • Grades: K-2nd
      • • Time: Program lasts 1 hour and includes time to explore the living exhibits

The Shape of Shells   (2nd – 3rd grades)

Shells come in a variety of shapes and sizes and are found on beaches, mudflats, and the intertidal. Focusing on snails, students will learn that shells are made by animals and how shell shape gives hints to how the animal lived.  Students will observe living snails, make predictions of how different shell structures protect snails from different predators, and sort shells to explore classification.

Concepts covered:
Animal Diversity
Morphology
Adaptation
Classification

      • • Grades: 2nd-3rd
      • • Time: Program lasts 60 minutes; add an additional 30 minutes if you want students to have time to explore the rest of the CMLC

Fish: What Their Morphology and Coloration Tell Us   (3rd – 5th grades)

The shape of fish, including tail shape, mouth orientation, and tooth type, give clues about the way fish live. The body shape of a fish provides hints of where they spend their time and of their ability to move. Tail shape influences swimming speed and maneuverability. Tooth type and mouth orientation indicate the type of prey they eat and where they find their prey. Coloration also provides clues to a fish’s lifestyle.  Morphology and coloration are both influenced by selective pressures. Students will learn how traits are adaptations for different situations and survival strategies, and then examine the center’s fish to identify these traits and adaptations.

Concepts covered:
Fish Diversity
Morphology
Form and function
Adaptation and selective pressures

      • • Grades: 3rd – 5th
      • • Time: Program lasts 1 hour and 15 min. Add an additional 20 minutes if you want students to have time to explore the rest of the CMLC

Sharks of the Oregon Coast — Designed to Survive  (4th – 6th grades)

This program introduces students to the variety of sharks found off Oregon and to the adaptations of sharks that make them successful in their various environments.  Sharks come in a range of sizes and shapes, eat a variety of prey, and are found in just about every ocean habitat.  At least 16 species are found off the Oregon coast.  Students will handle and examine shark jaws, teeth fossils, and skin, and learn about Oregon’s sharks and how shark sensory systems and physical adaptations have allowed them to roam the ocean for more than 400 million years.

Concepts covered:
Shark Diversity
Adaptation
Sensory Systems
Ecosystem Health

      • • Grades: 4th – 6th
      • • Time: Program lasts 60 minutes; add an additional 30 minutes if you want students to have time to explore the rest of the CMLC

Marine Mammals in Motion   (7th – 12th grades)fullsizerender

The skeletal architecture of marine mammals is very different than that of terrestrial mammals due to the nature of the medium they move through: water.  In this program students will investigate and compare the skeletons of whales and dolphins to develop hypotheses as to how skeletal anatomy relates to swimming, diving, and feeding capabilities.  Based on the observations and knowledge gained from these comparisons, students will put together the skeleton of a “mystery” cetacean and identify its method of moving and feeding.  The program emphasizes the diversity of ways whales and dolphins move and feed in the water.

Concepts covered:
Cetacean diversity
The mechanics of motion
Anatomical form & function
Developing hypotheses from observations

      • • Grades: Upper Middle and High School (7th-12th)
      • • Time: This program takes a full 2 hours. We recommend you plan for 2 1/2 hours so students can also look around the CMLC

Self-Guided Class or Camp Visits

For groups between 15 and 40 children, we can arrange visits Tuesdays 8:30am-5pm and Wednesdays-Fridays 8:30-11:00 am. If fewer than 15, come during standard open hours: Wednesdays-Saturdays 11 am-5 pm.

      • •Students are free
      • •Self-guided by group’s teachers or counselors, no formal tour or program
      • •Please note—this is not unstructured time, rather an opportunity for teachers and counselors to run their own programs tailored to their focus
      • •Must have 1 chaperone for every 6 students (preK-6th grade) or every 10 students (7th – 12th grade)
      • • Contact us regarding special needs


 

cmlc with wind turbine

 

 

Wind Turbine

The CMLC is the first net-zero building in the area, getting all of its power from a wind turbine on the OIMB campus.

This is part of the University of Oregon’s Sustainability program and is the UO’s first venture into wind power.